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Description archivistique
George Forrest Collection
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Incomplete letter from George Forrest, China Inland Mission, Talifu, to Clementina Traill

Incomplete letter from George Forrest, China Inland Mission, Talifu, to Clementina Traill dated 28 March 1905.
The letter is incomplete, comprising pages numbered 1-12, 13 and 15. Forrest continues his description of Tali [Dali] where marble is the main product; details of production process; wood for furniture mainly walnut and other trades include silversmiths, coppersmiths and horn workers. Description of house construction, method of brickmaking, ornamentation and arrangement of buildings; female clothing, make-up and footbinding, men’s dress and hairstyles. Education consists almost entirely of learning Confucian classics; parental power of life and death over children; prevalence of opium smoking and suicide; wide variety of food available. Includes rough sketch of a two-storey house and of a pouch for holding cash.
Plants referred to: on pp.12-13: Apricot; Bean; Cabbage; Carrot; Filbert; Fig; Gleditschia; Grape; Lemon; Mandarin orange; Pea; Peach; Pear; Persimmon; Pomegranate; Potato; Rice; Sapindus; Sultana; Turnip; Walnut

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Incomplete letter from George Forrest, Mission Apostolique, Tsekou, to Clementina Traill

Incomplete letter from George Forrest, Mission Apostolique, Tsekou, to Clementina Traill dated 28 April 1905.
The letter is incomplete, comprising 16 complete pages and fragments of pages 17 and 19. Forrest describes his journey from Talifu [Dali] to Tsekou [Cigu], going north by Chien Chuan; overnight camp in temple and first row with Chinese; loss of mule in gully and refusal of muleteers to go on; rescue by party of Lissoos who helped Forrest continue ascent through deep snow. Arrival at Wei Hsi; meeting with Pere Bourdonnec of the Mission Apostolique in Tibet and startling news of revolt amongst the lamas in the north; Tsekou mission in danger and consul Litton on his way with troops to defend it; murder of missionaries and Christian natives at Atunze and Batang; Forrest advised to remain at Wei Hsi but continued to Tsekou which he found practically in a state of siege. ‘All this is a bit of a nuisance as I cannot go far away from the place and therefore cannot do much collecting. Fortunately there isn’t much to be done at present – at least in the seed line, and, although during my journey from Tali I collected specimens of over 100 species, yet these were only flowering in the lower parts of the valleys. Here very few flowers are in bloom now, the mountains being still heavily coated with snow.’
Plants referenced: Pine (passim)

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